Design a Website that works for your Brand is Here’s the good news: You really can have a website that performs well AND presents a strong Brand message. But you’re going to have to go beyond the template-driven who, what, when and where approach that’s so common these days. Here’s what you’re going to need to build a website that works on both levels: 

The 4 critical elements of website design and effective web development.

1. A concept :

A concept is the foundation of every great site, and probably the single most overlooked element for all business owners. And let me be very clear.

  • A WordPress theme is not a concept.
  • A new logo is not a concept.
  • A photo of your product is not a concept.
  • A photo of the exterior of your building is not a concept.
  • A photo of your team is not a concept.
  • See, a concept is an idea.

In web design it’s an idea in the form of words, visuals and technical features that come together in rest first impression. If you have a idea behind your site all the other elements will come together seamlessly. The problem is, most website builders don’t have the originality, or the sales skills or the knowledge of your market, or the necessary budget to actually develop a cohesive concept for your site. Design a Website that works for your Brand That’s just too much to ask of one person. They can’t do all that, and then write the code to boot! That’s like asking the architect of your new house to also pour the foundation, do the framing, the plumbing, the electrical and the heating system, all by himself.

2. A clear call to action

This one’s attractive simple, and it’s not just a big ass button that says “buy now.” Every page of your site should have an objective and a preferred action for the consumer. Think of it as leading them down the primrose path. You want to take their hand and show them the way… Click here. Read this. Watch this. Listen to this.

Order that. Give the user something to do that leads them deeper into the site and further along in the sales process. They will seldom behave how you want them to, but the alternative is a hodge-podge of pages and elements that lead nowhere.

3. Differentiating elements

A good story is your best differentiating element. As the old saying goes, facts tell but stories sell. Narrative, characters and plot twists are universally appealing, and very few companies present compelling stories.

So find an interesting way to tell your story. Maybe it’s animation, or video, or a prezzie-style slide show, or even a game. A game can be a differentiating element as well as a concept. Can you transform your web experience into a relevant game? Would that be appropriate for your brand?

Differentiating elements: Concept, photo, copy, call to action.

Photography can also be a great differentiation. The human brain skips right over familiar images, so don’t settle for the $10 stock photos that everyone else in your category is using. Hire a pro and make your stuff look better. Sexier. More graphic.

Copy writing. Don’t let anyone convince you that great web copy is only about keywords, search engine optimization and factual “content.” Every sentence is an opportunity to stand out — or be thrown out.

4. Reasons to Believe

Landings, concepts and images are important, but you also need some facts to back them up. You need proof that your brand delivers, as promised.

For instance, post some testimonials or reviews from your happy customers. Release engineering data. Competitive reports. White papers. Market research. People make emotional decisions, but they often need facts to justify what they’ve already decided.  Design a Website that works for your Brand So give them what they need, and do it in various forms on multiple pages. When they’re checking out, remind them that they’ve made a great decision.